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Full text of "Coastwide fishery resource assessment"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



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UNITED STATES 




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NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION ' 








• NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 







COMMERCIAL FISHERIES RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACT 

FINAL REPORT 

State: Massachusetts 

Sub-Project No. : 3-375-R-3 

Project Title: Coastvide Fishery Resource Assessment 

Sub-Project Titlei Fishery Resource Assessment, Coastal Massachusetts " v 

Period covered: January 21, 1985 - January 20, 1986 

Prepared by: Arnold B« Howe, Senior Marine Fisheries Biologist Date: 12/17/86 
Thomas P. Currier, Marine Fisheries Biologist 
Sherry L, Sass, Assistant Marine Fisheries Biologist 
Brian C, Kelly, Assistant Marine Fisheries Biologist 

Approved by: f^' UK/c \^ L^^'l^id^Jdy Assistant Director Date: /^/7^/^er 




Statement of Project Accomplishment 
(Not for Publication) 






DBC2019S7 

""^'^'^fy of a;.,,„ , 



JBLICATION: #l4,922-26-45-7-87-CR 
jproved by the State Pxirchaslng Agent 



INTRODUCTION 



The Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries (MDMF) Resource Assessment 
Project has conducted semiannual bottom trawl surveys of marine waters within 
the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth since 1978 and an annual, standardized 
seine survey in estuaries on the south shore of Cape Cod since 1975. The pur- 
pose of the seine survey is to predict annual changes in strength of recruiting 
winter flounder cohorts from age abundance indices for a major Massachusetts 
stock unit. Research cruise objectives were multi-species oriented and 
included: 1) estimating relative abundance of groundfish and certain shellfish 
species in terms of weight and number; 2) describing species composition and 
distribution in relation to depth, temperature, and salinity; and 3) collecting 
information for a wide variety of assessment related activities. These tasks 
or 'jobs' have been partially funded through the Commercial Fisheries Research 
and Development Act (PL 88-309) and were undertaken through 1985 under project 
3-375-R. Prior survey results have been fully described in 1978-84 annual 
reports. 

The ultimate goal and logical extension of these monitoring programs has 
been to meet agency management needs for concise, up-to-date assessment informa- 
tion, i.e., fisheries- independent trends in abundance of exploited fish age-groups 
and relative size of pre-exploitable year-classes. In addition, to accommodate 
a recently revised flow of assessment information throughout the northeastern 
region of the U.S., and to maximize our opportunity to participate in the new 
stock assessment workshop process, it was necessary to simplify this report. 
Accordingly, for each of seven of the state's most important fishery resources, 
we utilize the timeseries of survey results as well as commercial landings 
data from state territorial waters (0-3 mi) to update the status of inshore 
Massachusetts fishery resources for 1986. 



SAMPLING PROCEDURES 

Systematic bottom trawl surveys are conducted in daylight during May and 
September. On each survey an average of 96 stations are sampled according to 
a stratified random design. State territorial and internal waters are divided 
into depth zones (strata) and geographic sampling regions. The overall number 
of sampling stations (trawl tows) is allocated to strata in proportion to 
the area of each stratum. Tow locations are pre-selected at random. The 
fishing gear consists of a 3/4 North Atlantic type two seam trawl (39' heddrope/ 
51' footrope) equipped with a fine mesh (0.25") codend liner, rubber disc 
(3.0") chain sweep, wooden doors (6' x 40", 325 lbs) and 10 fathom legs. Tow 
time is 20 minutes at 2.5 knots. Sampling intensity is one station per 20 
sq n mi. 

Seining of six Cape Cod estuaries occurs from mid-June to early July and 
only on the top half of the diurnal tidal cycle. A total of 49 permanent 
beach stations (147 hauls) subjectively chosen for efficient seining are 
allocated in proportion to each estuary's (stratum) littoral perimeter. To 



ennumerate 0-group winter flounder density at each station, three hauls are 
made from a depth of 1.0-1.3 m and perpendicular to shore with a 6.4 ram nylon 
mesh, 6 m straight seine equipped with a heavily weighted lead line to mini- 
mize escapement. Area swept is estimated by multiplying seine spread by 
paced seining distance. 

Data from both surveys are coded and entered for analyses on the Woods 
Hole Oceanographic Institution's Digital Equipment Corporation VAX-1 1/780 
computer system. Additional details on sampling and analytical procedures 
are provided in previous reports. 



Atlantic Cod 



Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank/ southern New England cod stocks represent 
principal elements of groundfish fisheries off the northeast coast. We present 
data only for the former stock which inhabits Massachusetts inshore waters 
north of Cape Cod (Regions 4-5) from late autumn to spring. 

In the mid-1970 's, expanding stock biomass brought about by a series of 
above-average year-classes supported a trend of increasing total U.S. commercial 
landings which peaked in 1983 at 30.9 million pounds. Reported Massachusetts 
annual inshore landings indicate that cod were more available in 1978 but in the 
following year declined abruptly and since then have remained below three 
million pounds (Figure lA) . Between 1978 and 1983, DMF inshore survey biomass 
indices for sampling regions north of Cape Cod fluctuated between 12 and 
22kg/ tow; thereafter, they declined 63% from the initial six-year average. 
This and the following assessment of year-class strength suggest that stock 
abundance has declined in recent years. 

Over 90% of DMF survey-caught cod are < 19 inches and are mostly immature 
fish of age-groups 0-2. The spring survey thus offers the first opportunity 
to assess strength of newly-hatched young-of-the-year as well as to reevaluate 
earlier, but still pre-recruit, cohorts. As shown in Figure IB, the 1982-85 
year-classes at age appear to be the weakest in the timeseries. Although 
this initial assessment has not always been confirmed by subsequent surveys, 
a four year period of apparently less than average recruitment could have only 
hastened a downturn for a Gulf of Maine cod stock presently under high 
commercial fishing effort. 



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Yellowtail Flounder 



The 'Cape Cod ground' yellowtail flounder group, found in waters off the 
eastern shore of Cape Cod to around Cape Ann, is the only population sub-unit 
sampled by the DMF inshore survey. Total U.S. commercial landings increased 
from the early 1970 's to a record 12.6 million pounds in 1980, but have 
since declined. 

Because yellowtail flounder recruit to the fishery at age 2 (approximately 
25 cm or 10 inches) , the DMF autumn survey catch of one-year-olds provides a 
pre-recruit index that appears to track this resource reasonably well. Peak 
abundance noted in the 1979 territorial water fishery (Figure 2A) was caused 
by a series of apparently above-average year-classes, notably those of 1978 
and 1979, which were prominent as one-year-olds (Figure 2B) . The former 
appears to have been excessively cropped as two-year-olds in early 1980, when 
fishing effort was spurred by a complicated New England Fishery Management 
Council plan involving quarterly quotas, vessel allocations, and trip limits. 
Following this event, the equally strong 1979 cohort recruited in 1981, pro- 
pelled the DMF spring biomass index to its high point, and sustained the 
fishery through the following year. Since then, the fishery has been dependent 
upon recruitment of cohorts seemingly no better than average; consequently, 
sustained fishing effort has sharply reduced population size. As shown in 
Figure 2B, the 1984 and 1985 cohorts appear to be weak as pre-recruits so 
no recovery can be predicted before 1988. Commercial landings of yellowtail 
flounder from inshore grounds should continue to decline in 1986. 



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Winter Flounder 



Important commercial fishing grounds for this species include Georges 
Bank, Nantucket Shoals, and coastal locations. Historically, Massachusetts 
ports have contributed 75% of the annual U.S. commercial landings of winter 
flounder, and a major portion of the northeast coast's recreational catch 
occurs in state waters. 

From the mid-1970 's, total U.S. landings increased to an all-time high 
of 39.0 million pounds in 1981, but since then have declined to 32.4 million 
pounds in 1984. During this period, directed fishing effort increased, 
especially on southern New England grounds by Cape Cod and New Bedford 
vessels. The percentage of small and "peewee" market category fish in 
landings increased steadily, while the percentage of large fish decreased. 
This was an indication of growth overfishing, i.e., fish were being caught 
before they grew to a size where biomass (yield) was maximized. 

The DMF spring biomass indices reflect a trend similar to reported 
landings from inshore waters until 1983 (Figure 3A) . In that year, the 
commercial catch declined 8% to the lowest level since 1975; however, the 
survey index increased 60%, primarily on elevated catches of pre-recruit 
( < 11 inches or 27 cm) fish (Figure 3B) . Subsequent annual declines in the 
survey index and commercial landings suggests that the 1983 index was ano- 
molous and probably related to a clumped distribution of small flounder that 
spring. The reported decline in inshore commercial landings of 60% since 
1981 infers that present population levels may be more reduced than the most 
recent survey index indicates. 

Young-of-the-year abundance indices from DMF estuarine seine surveys 
suggest that recruitment on major fishing grounds south and east of Cape Cod 
will be below average for the next several years (Figure 3C) . Each year-class 
recruits over several ages, so year-to-year fluctuations in recruitment tend 
to be minimized; however, with a declining trend in year-class size and with 
the 1983 cohort significantly weaker than all others, no upturn in recruit- 
ment can be predicted before 1987 which is when the size of the 1984 cohort 
manifests itself. With overall fishing effort high, commercial landings 
should continue to decrease. Now, with a lesser proportion of older, more 
fecund fish in the spawning groups (because of growth overfishing) , managers 
must be concerned about reproductive potential being undercut which would 
result in even more recruitment uncertainty. 



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Summer Flounder 



Summer flounder (fluke) enter southern Massachusetts waters in May and 
generally leave inshore areas by October. During summer months, age 2 and 
older fish ( > 12 inches) are sought by both recreational and commercial 
fishermen. Smaller, pre-recruit fluke are primarily found in estuaries and 
embayments between North Carolina and New Jersey. 

Total U.S. commercial landings averaged 20.7 million pounds annually in 
1976-78, following nearly a decade of advancement. In 1979, landings surged 
to 32.0 million pounds; this peak was attributable in part to an increase in 
effort in the southern winter trawl fishery. After declining to the 1976-78 
level in 1981, a three year upturn brought 1984 landings to 31.3 million 
pounds. 

From 1978-83, spring biomass indices for the entire survey area predicted 
the trend in commercial landings from Massachusetts* inshore waters (Figure 4). 
In 1984, fluke and some other migrant species arrived somewhat later than 
usual in southern New England inshore waters reducing availability of fluke 
during the spring survey. For the year, inshore landings remained relatively 
high. 

A sharp upturn (133%) in the 1985 survey index was attributed to resumption 
of the normal, seasonal migration pattern and good recruitment of two-, and 
three-year-olds (1982-83 cohorts). Subsequently, Massachusetts landings from 
inshore waters decreased 26%; however, Massachusetts landings (total) increased 
45% indicating that the pattern of commercial fishing effort changed in 1985 
increasing significantly on southern New England offshore grounds. Even if 
recruitment remains favorable, high fishing mortality rates make the present 
level of stock biomass unsustainable. Commercial landings should decrease 
in 1986. 



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Scup 

Scup is an important species to trap fishermen, draggermen, and sports- 
fishermen. From the mid-1970 's total U.S. commercial landings gradually 
increased to 21.6 million pounds in 1981, but have since declined by 20%. 
The DMF spring survey index of abundance paralleled the pronounced decline 
in landings that occurred from inshore waters in 1981, and since then has 
generally followed the trend in landings but at a proportionately lower 
magnitude (Figure 5A) . 

From 1978-80, at least five age groups were evident in spring survey 
catches. Beginning in 1981 and continuing through 1983, one- and two-year-olds 
were much more abundant than older fish. This was reflected by an increasing 
proportion of small market category scup in commercial catches and a 122% 
increase in landings over the period. Following this increase in abundance, 
the 1984 spring survey catch-per-tow-at-length data and annual landing 
information indicated a return to more multi-age catches while landings 
remained relatively good. Thus, DMF bottom trawl survey indices and/or 
fisheries dependent data indicated an increase in the local population occur- 
ring at a four year interval. In each case, the pre-recruit index, representing 
summer spawned young-of-the-year taken in the autumn survey, was a reasonable 
predictor of elevated commercial landings two and three years later (Figure 5B) . 

With the stock apparently fully exploited and with repeated indications 
of declining recruitment after 1982, stock biomass and catches should continue 
to decline in 1986. 



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Black Sea Bass 



Migrating to southern Massachusetts waters in early spring, black sea bass 
( Centropristis striata) usually concentrate over hard bottom, wrecks and reefs. 
They are an important sport fish throughout the Middle Atlantic Bight and are 
fully recruited to the fish pot and trawl fisheries at age 2 (8 inches) and 3 
(11 inches), respectively. After 1981, the pot catch became of increasing 
importance within Massachusetts territorial waters. 

The most recent peak in total U.S. commercial landings occurred in 1977 
at 14.1 million pounds; thereafter, annual catches dropped steadily to 2.4 
million pounds in 1981. Massachusetts' inshore landings were at their low 
level two years earlier but increased 363% over the next five years before 
declining 5% in 1985 (Figure 6A) . 

Despite the fact that the type of bottom where sea bass congregate is 
more often avoided than trawled during a research survey, the 1978-83 DMF 
spring biomass indices, reflecting age 2 and older fish, have generally 
followed the upward trend in landings of f ishable stock (Figure 6A) . Since 
1983, biomass indices have decreased, diverging from relatively high annual 
inshore landings. Decreased availability in May, 1984 and 1985, because of 
delayed immigration appears to have been a factor in reduced survey catches. 

The 1981 DMF autumn pre-recruit index (Figure 6B) did not forecast the 
large increase in commercial landings which occurred in 1983. This suggests 
that the dramatic upturn may have resulted more from an increase in fishing 
effort than a real increase in abundance. Clearly, an apparent outstanding 
1982 year-class seems to have helped propel landings further upward in 1984. 
Currently intense commercial fishing effort in state waters and moderate 
recruitment expected from the 1984 cohort is expected to result in another 
decrease in inshore landings for 1986. 



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Longfin Squid 

Under domestic management of the 200-mile fishing zone, the longfin squid, 
Loligo pealei , has been of increasing value to the U.S. fishery. Catches from 
1968-77 were dominated by international fleets exploiting concentrations on 
offshore wintering grounds. Total U.S. annual catch rose to 83.0 million 
pounds in 1973 then fell to 23.9 million pounds in 1978. With emphasis gradually 
shifting to a U.S. inshore summer fishery, the more recent total landings 
trend has resembled that from Massachusetts waters (Figure 7A) . The DMF spring 
survey biomass index has mirrored landings from state waters through 1984. 
In 1985 the index diverged from landings as the distribution of domestic 
fishing effort geographically changed. The survey index displayed a 61% 
upturn while inshore landings declined by an equal percentage. At the same 
time, landings from offshore Southern New England more than doubled those of 
1984. 

Two spawning peaks in May and September result in two overlapping life 
cycles, one procreating the other. The early (spring) cohort's cycle is usually 
14-16 months, with spawning during the summer of its second year. During the 
spring fishery, these maturing individuals are 3-7 inches (mantle length) . 
Their progeny, the late (summer) cohort, has an 18-20 month cycle. Maturation 
occurs during the second winter offshore and spawning occurs upon arrival 
inshore in spring. Individuals from the late cohort are 7-11 inches in spring 
catches. Larger spawners, up to 16 inches, are believed to be survivors of 
an early cohort. From 1978-85, about 50% and 29% of the spring survey catch 
(by number) consisted of the prior year's spring and autumn cohorts, respect:^ 
ively. Thus, over the timeseries, recruitment has accounted for about 79% 
of exploitable squid numbers in Massachusetts waters. 

The DMF autumn index of pre-recruit squid ( < 3 inches) , reflecting annual 
production in a principal spawning/ nursery area, has been predictive of the 
following May's survey catch as well as annual inshore commercial landings 
(Figure 7B) . Dominated by the (late) autumn cohort ( < 1.5 inches), the 
1985 pre-recruit index was 400% higher than the 1984 level and 53% above the 
1978-84 average. The potential commercial catch in 1986, therefore, might 
be expected to exceed that of 1985. However, twice before when the late 
cohort was very abundant, inshore landings the following year were less than 
anticipated. Moreover, DMF survey length composition information suggests 
that a more important contributor to high annual Massachusetts landings is 
the survivability of the older, previous year's cohorts and their attendant 
growth in weight. For example, the 1981 cohorts were very strong components 
of the 1983 survey catch, the year of the excellent inshore fishery. 
Importantly, because 1984 cohorts were observed in very low abundance that 
autumn, lower inshore commercial catches should be expected in 1986 unless 
fishing pressure increases on small (3-7 inch) squid. 



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(6>1) MOi/iM NV3h a3Uiivais 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



We thank the Captains and crew of the R/V GLORIA MICHELLE for their 
seventh and eighth excellent survey efforts on our behalf. Members of the 
NMFS/URI Fisheries Engineering Group included: Lt JG John Bailey, Lt JG 
Tom Callahan, John Kenney, Vern Nulk, and Lt JG Gary Bulmer. Ken Barton 
and Grayson Wood, NMFS Narragansett Laboratory, also lent assistance. 

We are grateful to W. Leigh Bridges, who capably administered the 
project and reviewed this report, and 20 other members of the Division staff 
who worked with us at sea or provided logistical support. The assistance 
of eight guest scientists on board was also appreciated. Dr. Robert Murchelano, 
NMFS Oxford Laboratory, provided considerable inspiration and technical aid 
to us during the course of 1985 studies. 



Appendix Table 1. Allotment of sampling effort to 

Massachusetts inshore strata, 1985 
survey cruises. 







Stratum 


Depth Range 


Area 


Number 


Stations 


Re^ 


ion 


No.* 


Meters 


Feet 


(sq n mi) 


Spring 


Autumn 


1. 


Buzzards Bay 


11 


< 9.3 


< 30 


102 


5 


5 




Vineyard Sound 


12 


9.4-18.3 


31- 60 


160 


8 


8 




and coastal 


13 


18.4-27.4 


61- 90 


88 


4 


3 




water south of 


14 


27.5-36.6 


91-120 


16 


2 


2 • 




Martha's Vineyard 














2. 


Nantucket Sound 


15 


< 9.3 


< 30 


190 


10 


9 






16 


9.4-18.3 


31- 60 


212 


10 


10 


3. 


East of Cape Cod, 


17 


< 9.3 


< 30 


85 


3 


4 




Race Point to 


18 


9.4-18.3 


31- 60 


88 


4 


3 




Muskeget Island 


19 


18.4-27.4 


61- 90 


39 


2 


2 






20 


27.5-36.6 


91-120 


24 


2 


2 






21 


36.7-54.9 


121-180 


40 


2 


2 


4. 


Cape Cod Bay 


25 


< 9.3 


< 30 


47 


3 


3 






26 


9.4-18.3 


31-^ 60 


87 


5 


5 






27 


18.4-27.4 


61- 90 


94 


4 


5 






28 


27.5-36.6 


91-120 


93 


5 


5 






29 


36.7-54.9 


121-180 


103 


4 


5 






30 


> 55.0 


> 181 


32 


2 


2 


5. 


Massachusetts Bay 


31 


< 9.3 


< 30 


41 


3 


3 




north to New 


32 


9.4-18.3 


31- 60 


49 


3 


2 




Hampshire border 


33 


18.4-27.4 


61- 90 


78 


3 


3 






34 


27.5-36.6 


91-120 


38 


3 


3 






35 


36.7-54.9 


121-180 


174 


4 


4 






36 


> 55.0 


> 181 


33 


3 


4 



Sampling strata begin with #11 to coordinate with Rhode Island survey design. 
Strata #22-24 have been allotted to Nantucket Shoals should survey coverage 
be eventually extended seaward. 



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Appendix Table 3. Average bottom temperature ("C) by depth interval and 

region, Massachusetts inshore bottom trawl surveys, 
spring and autumn, 1985. 



SPRING 



Depth (m) 



Region <9.3 9.4-18.3 18.4-27.4 27.5-36.6 36,7-54,9 >55.0 Mean Range 
1 12.1 11.1 11.4 10,5 11.4 9,7-13,6 



2 


13.1 


11.6 




3 


9,4 


10.6 


10.1 


4 


10.3 


8.9 


8.0 


5 


7.6 


7.3 


6.2 



7.8 



6.8 



5.9 



7.0 



5.8 



4.7 



5.0 



4.5 



11.8 10.7-12.6 



9.4 6.2-12,1 



7,4 5,1-12,7 



5.7 4.1- 7.6 



AUTUMN 
Depth (m) 
Region <9.3 9.4-18.3 18.4-27.4 27.5-36.6 36.7-54.9 >55.0 Mean Range 
1 19.3 18,8 18,5 16.5 18.8 16.5-20.9 



19.1 



16.9 



16.4 



19.0 



15.4 



14.6 



15.6 



13.6 



13.6 



11.6 



9.1 



9.8 



19.0 17.0-20.5 



14.8 



8.2 12.4 



8.6-18.2 



7.8-17.7 



16.2 



14.4 



13.8 



10.4 



9.2 



8.1 11.4 



7.2-16.4 



Appendix Table 4. 



Average 1985 seasonal surface and bottom temperature 
(^C) and surface salinity compared with respective 
1978-84 seasonal cruise and mean values, Massachusetts 
territorial waters. 



SPRING 







Average Tempi 


erature (*C) 


Year 


Cruise Dates 


Surface 


Bottom 


1978 


12 May- 11 Jun 


13.1 


10.7 


1979 


30 Apr-27 May 


11.2 


8.9 


1980 


5 May- 2 4 May 


10.6 


9.1 


1981 


6 May- 21 May 


9.8 


8.5 


1982 


• 4 May- 21 May 


10.2 


7.8 


1983 


9 May-25 May 


10.3 


8.9 


1984 


7 May-22 May 


10.6 


8.3 



Average Salinity °/ 

Surface 

'30.9 
30.9 
31.9 
30.7 
31.9 
31.1 
29.4 



o^ 



Mean, 1978-84 



10.8 



8.9 



30.8 



1985 



6 May-22 May 



10.5 



9.0 



31.2 



AUTUMN 



Year 

1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 



Mean, 1978-84 



Cruise 


Dates 


5 


Sep- 


- 2 


Oct 


11 


Sep- 


- 4 


Oct 


8 


Sep- 


-29 


Sep 


14 


Sep- 


■ 5 


Oct 


8 


Sep- 


-27 


Sep 


7 


Sep- 


-24 


Sep 


10 


Sep- 


-27 


Sep 



1985 



3 Sep-19 Sep 



Average Temp^ 


erature ("C) 


Surface 


Bottom ■ 


16.1 


12.8 


15.3 


12.6 


17.8 


- 14.3 


16.4 


15.4 


17.0 


13.3 


19.5 


* 


17.3 


13.5 


16.6 


13.6 


18.3 


15.2 



Surface 



31. 


.8 


31. 


.5 


31, 


.8 


31. 


.7 


32. 


.5 


31. 


.7 


31. 


.1 



31.4 



30.9 



*Instrument malfunction 



Appendix Table 5 



Weight (kiloSrsms) and number for species collected during 
the 1985 sprina and autumn bottom trawl surveys* Massachusetts 
territorial waters* 



COMMON 
NAME 



WINTER SKATE 

OCEAN POUT 

NORTHERN SEAROBIN 

LITTLE SKATE 

WINTER FLOUNDER 

TAUT06 

LONGHORN SCULPIN 

SPINY DOGFISH 

WINDOUPANE 

LONGFIN SQUID 

SPIDER CRAB 

YELLOWTAIL FLOUNDER 

AMERICAN PLAICE 

ROCK CRAB 

ATLANTIC COD 

RED HAKE 

AMERICAN LOBSTER 

SCUP 

MOON SNAIL 

SILVER HAKE 

SMOOTH DOGFISH 

KNOBBED WHELK 

FOURSPOT FLOUNDER 

SUMMER FLOUNDER 

THORNY SKATE 

SEA RAVEN 

CHANNELED WHELK 

AMERICAN SAND LANCE 

LADY CRAB 

CUNNER 

SNAKEBLENNY 

BUTTERFISH 

600SEFISH 

BLACK SEA BASS 

WITCH FLOUNDER 

ALEWIFE 

ATLANTIC WOLFFISH 

SEA SCALLOP 

HORSESHOE CRAB 

HADDOCK 

ATLANTIC HERRING 

STRIPED SEAROBIN 

BLUEFISH 

OCEAN QUAH06 

SURF CLAM 

MUSSEL 

DAUBED SHANNY 
WHITE HAKE 

FOURBEARD ROCKLING 
POLLOCK 



SPRING 


SPRING 


FALL 


FALL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


WEIGHT 


NUMBER 


WEIGHT 


NUMBER 


4567»3 


3083 


3577.7 


1635 


4192»9 


5727 


48.1 


444 


3301.9 


15936 


167.9 


1739 


1461.3 


2550 


918.1 


1671 


1217.9 


4345 


357.1 


2110 


725.9 


396 


165.9 


173 


471.3 


2734 


32.3 


310 


400.4 


93 


30201.3 


12599 


370.9 


1406 


58.3 


470 


356.8 


5730 


324.9 


56945 


292.9 


2642 


42.7 


777 


272.5 


1041 


103.6 


681 


235.5 


2867 


207.5 


3660 


212.6 


2259 


346.9 


3280 


212.1 


621 


4,4 


127 


193.4 


1167 


601.6 


2462 


172.7 


712 


431.6 


1794 


170.2 


3295 


1032.2 


' 54775 


144.4 


1321 


33.9 


301 


139.5 


1622 


360.9 


3453 


136.2 


43 


481.5 


972 


110.4 


326 


68.3 


174 


105.5 


536 * 


64.1 


332 


87.2 


138 


153.7 


177 


57.9 


51 


15.7 


36 


42.6 


60 


4.1 


14 


41.0 


148 


42.3 


159 


39.7 


4223 


4.0 


912 


35.3 


813 


190.4 


4000 


32.4 


425 


1.5 


80 


31.9 


611 


1.4 


39 


31.6 


530 


211.1 


12503 


31.3 


8 


156.5 


18 


30.3 


65 


44.1 


9613 


29.4 


41 


30.9 


50 


26.6 


351 


2.8 


38 


26.6 


5 






19.5 


65 


35.2 


206 


12.5 


8 


53.1 


34 


8.7 


9 






6.2 


124 


6.6 


125 


5.7 


24 


4.9 


65 


5.5 


2 


23.3 


66 


4.7 


21 


12.7 


49 


4.7 


11 


9.9 


23 


4.5 


144 


3.1 


51 


3.7 


490 


0.0 


10 


3.4 


157 


20.3 


1107 


3.4 


44 


8.0 


146 


2.7 


86 


1.4 


6 



Appendix Table 5 



COMMON 
NAME 

ATLANTIC MACKEREL 
AMERICAN SHAD 
JONAH CRAB 
CLEARNOSE SKATE 
BAY SCALLOP 
BLUEBACK HERRING 
HARD CLAM 
OYSTER TOADFISH 

ATLANTIC MENHADEN 

CONGER EEL 

AMERICAN EEL 

RAINBOW SMELT 

NORTHERN PUFFER 

ROCK GUNNEL 

SPOTTED HAKE 

ATLANTIC SILVERSIDE 

GULF STREAM FLOUNDER 

SEASNAIL 

NORTHERN PIPEFISH 

ALLIGATORFISH 

STRIPED ANCHOVY 

OCTOPUS 

GRUBBY 

UEAKFISH 

ATLANTIC 

SHORTFIN 

NORTHERN 

URYMOUTH 

SPOT 

MACKEREL 

BLUE CRAB 

HOGCHOKER 

BAY ANCHOVY 

PLANEHEAD FILEFISH 

SMOOTH SKATE 

ROUGH SCAD 

6UA6UANCHE 

REDFISH OR OCEAN PERCH 

SNAKEFISH 

ATLANTIC TOMCOD 

BIGEYE SCAD 

SHORT BIGEYE 

BIGEYE 

RED GOATFISH 

ROUND HERRING 

ATLANTIC SAURY 

ORANGE FILEFISH 

MOUSTACHE SCULPIN 

SNAPPER 

GRAY TRI6GERFISH 

NAKED GOBY 

TOTALS 



MOONFISH 

SQUID 

KINGFISH 



SCAD 



(Continued) 








SPRING 


SPRING 


FALL 


FALL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


WEIGHT 


NUMBER 


WEIGHT 


NUMBER 


2.6 


3 


■ 0.1 


2 


2.3 


31 


1.6 


13 


1.5 


10 


44.7 


181 


1.5 


5 






1.4 


17 


0.4 


5 


1.2 


15 


0.8 


14 


0.9 


2 






0.7 


2 


1.3 


2 


0.5 


2 


1.1 


3 


0.4 


1 






0.3 


1 


0.1 


1 


0.2 


29 


4.6 


390 


0.2 


1 


1.7 


72 


0.1 


18 


0.0 


8 


0.1 


4 


2.2 


22 


0.0 


2 


0.0 


4 


0.0 


1 


1.3 


134 


0.0 


1 






0.0 


1 


0.5 


350 


0.0 


27 


0.7 


97 


0.0 


5 


1.5. 


3019 


0.0 


1 


0.4 


6 


0.0 


1 










6.5 


774 






2.7 


376 




1 


2.3 


12 






1.3 


11 






1.3 


2 






0.8 


1 






0.6 


92 






0.6 


3 






0.6 


3 






0.5 


708 


• 




0.4 


45 






0.4 


1 






0.3 


25 






0.2 


14 






0.2 


2 






0.1 


106 






0.1 


1 






0.1 


1 






0.0 


17 






0.0 


8 






0.0 


5 






0.0 


3 






0.0 


1 






0.0 


1 






0.0 


1 






0.0 


1 






0.0 


4 




• 


0.0 


1 


20107.4 


69286 


40749.9 


186954 



Appendix Table 6. 



Winter flounder young-of-the-year statistics for 
each estuary sampled and all estuaries combined 
in 1985. 





Weighting 










Factor 






Number 




( n mi) 


Mean 


S.D. 


of Tows 


Great Pond 


7.31 


0.58 


0.305 


12 


Waquoit Bay 


17.38 


0.24 


0.159 


30 


Cotuit Bay 


24.08 


0.26 


0.265 


39 


Lewis Bay 


9.37 


0.32 


0.245 


15 


Bass River 


20.05 


0.20 


0.206 


33 


Stage Harbor 


11.66 


0.08 


0.072 


18 



All Estuaries Combined 



Total weighting coefficient 
Stratified mean 
95% Confidence limits 
Total number of tows 



89.85 
0.25 
0.203 - 0.298 
147 



R 



9.L 



•J •..; 



ACME 
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